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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 4, 1848.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 4, 1848.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb480404

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 4, 1848., Original located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washinton, D.C., file 7002., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb480404 (accessed November 28, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 4, 1848.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Washington Apl 4 '48


Carlisle

Dear Baird

It is a rule with printer's devils to "follow copy, if it goes out of the window," and with skippers, "to follow orders, if it breaks owners." In obedience to the great principle involved in these maxims, I send you Cuvier by Adam's Express, according to your directions, though I well know that my compliance with your request will occasion you bankruptcy.

That insatiable cormorant Adams will demand for the -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- carriage of the parcel more than thrice, yea, more than ten times, the original cost thereof, and thou will be beggared by his exorbitance. Many harpies have I known in my day, but Adams exceedeth them all. Koeppen, though by reason of the multitude of his talk, a tiresome, is yet an instructive and an amusing companion. Learned in historical fact, he cares nothing for the principles of history or any other knowledge, and superficial observer as he is, in power of lively & picturesque description he surpasses all other men.

Phillips must have been disappointed with my collection of engravings, & I was ashamed of it, when I found how vastly -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- superior his own is.

I am glad you are well over your Flytning (scottice flitting) I suppose you are Dane enough to understand that, "Three removes c" you know. I pray you next may be into a wider field of fame & labour. Mrs Marsh is, I am sorry to say, very ill. She has been running down for two months with obscure symptoms, & has kept her bed for several days. I think her physician (Dr Wislizenus of New Mexican memory) is embarrassed with the case, though he assures me he does not consider it alarming. We have here a Deutscher, one Lischke, secretary of the Prussian legation who is de -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- plorably given to the shooting of little innocent (yea, and being vernivorous, useful) birds, impaling of insects, disembowelling of fish, and pickling of crustaceans. Shall I mention you to him as one similarly moon-struck, affected with like barbarous propensities, and disposed to exchange bloody trophies?

Have you ever written to Mr Wheeler, & if not, why not? The love of all of us to all of you, and so farewell

Your sincere friend

Geo P Marsh

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