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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated February 8, 1851.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated February 8, 1851.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

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, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated February 8, 1851., , http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb510208 (accessed July 28, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated February 8, 1851.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information[NOTE: Material in brackets is taken from Carolyn Crane Marsh's Life and Letters of George Perkins Marsh, I, 203. The original manuscript is torn at this point.]

Nile Lat 24o 30' Feb 8 1851


My dear boy

We are thus far on our way to the second cataract, just now resting on a sand bank, with serious doubts whether the steamer, which was to take us to Assouan a few miles further, can pass it. I hoped to have heard that you were safely established at Washington and had received the keg (leaky & spoiled I fear), before I sailed from Constantinople, but the last I have received from you was dated just after your appointment to the Smith. Inst. As we came up in a steamboat, I could not stop to make collections, and besides, with the thermometer at 48o, asps, geckos, fresh crocodiles eggs, and the like, can't be said to be just in season. "When ice is in, serpents is out," but I have brought along divers jugs of spirits, and as we shall go down leisurely in a country-boat, I hope I shall be able to make some additions to your snakery, after it grows a little warmer. We saw five crocodiles basking on sand banks yesterday, and concluded they might prove ugly customers, if a nearer acquaintance were too assiduously pressed. At Esneh, they told us one lately came ashore there in hot pursuit of an Arab, who only escaped by climbing a tree, and our dragoman says that he saw a horse carried off by one not long since. Of birds there is a great store--water fowl chiefly--[but I think the botany of Egypt cannot offer much, because the whole soil is covered with the cultivated growth. Above the First Cataract there is said to be greater variety. I refer you to Dr. Wislizenus for such vague observations as I have been able to make, but they are too loose to be of much interest.... Write often and full, and make M. do the like, to

Your true friend

Geo. P. Marsh.]

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