page top

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated January 7, 1861 [1862]

Add to bookbag Add to Bookbag | Bookbag (0)

Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated January 7, 1861 [1862]

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Norton, Charles Eliot

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

Parent Collections

Other Formats

Access Conditions

For usage rights related to this resource please visit: http://cdi.uvm.edu/rights/
More information.

Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen620107

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated January 7, 1861 [1862], Original located at the Houghton Library, Harvard University, in the Harvard Norton Papers, identified as Harvard Norton Papers 4644., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen620107 (accessed April 20, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated January 7, 1861 [1862]

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Confidential
Turin Janu'y 7 61 [62]


My dear Sir

I have but a moment to thank you for your kind and interesting letter of, and to say that the essay you sent me never reached me. Trübner, to whom I applied for other copies through Mr Miller the Dispatch agent at London, says he never received any copies for me. Perhaps you could send one or two more.

I have never really believed that Fry would come -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- out here as Sec'y of Legation, though I have been assured repeatedly by the State Dept at Washington that he was "coming, coming." A letter from a friend at Paris received this morning leads me to suppose that he has given up the intention of crossing the Atlantic. This may be an error, but if it is indeed so, and the post would, as I hope, be acceptable to you, no time should be lost in moving at Washington. I am very desirous of aid, and very much more so of being freed from a vex- -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- atious annoyance and incumbrance in the shape of a secretary appointed by Buchanan and, in spite of my earnest remonstrances, allowed to hold over by Mr Seward. He is an enemy to his own government, and being a Papist and a Bourbonist to that of Italy also.

I cannot ask your appointment, because Mr Seward told me, in plain words, that the President did not wish me to interfere in the matter, but I am quite willing that it should be known that your nomination as secretary would be -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- just the one I should make, if the office were at my disposal.

Mrs Marsh joins me in sincere regards to your mother and sister as well as yourself and in the hope that we may see you all in Italy before many weeks.

Yours very truly

Geo P MarshC. E Norton Esq

Add a comment:

*

* Optional

User Comments