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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to HIRAM POWERS, dated February 15, 1864.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to HIRAM POWERS, dated February 15, 1864.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Powers, Hiram, 1805-1873

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

Parent Collections

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Access Conditions

For usage rights related to this resource please visit: http://cdi.uvm.edu/rights/
More information.

Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmhp640215

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to HIRAM POWERS, dated February 15, 1864., Part of the Hiram Powers and Powers Family Papers, microfilmed by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, and loaned by the Cincinnati Historical Society., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmhp640215 (accessed April 20, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to HIRAM POWERS, dated February 15, 1864.

Transcribed by : Ellen Mazur Thomson and Ralph H.Orth

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski andEllen Mazur Thomson


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Turin Monday Feb 15 '64


Dear Powers

I have just got back from Milan, whither I went to see the king through the fooleries of the carnevalone, & can write but a word.

The photographs have arrived & are most welcome. They will delight many an eye, & the proceeds will gladden many a sufferer.

I shall be very thankful for copies of the Eve, & will see that they go only into good hands. I thought it -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- as fine as possible in plaster but I now see that it is many degrees finer in marble.

Mr George W. Van Horne, U.S. Consul at Marseilles, will receive & forward to N.Y. all contributions. Please box your most liberal gift, & send it to him, I will be responsible for all expenses. It seems to me as fine a bust of W. as we have. I never liked Stewart's Washington quite. Yours is more like Houdon's, which Judge Marshall thought so well of & gives the benevolent expression, which Stewart's -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- head does not. The flat mouth & lips of Greenough's always much displeased me. In Houdon's statue, the head is thrown up in an arrogant, theatrical sort of a way which you have quite avoided.

On to Crawford's, there is an evident attempt to invent an expression for which there is no authority.

Bad news from home. There is, as I have always insisted, treason very high up in our government. Longstreet has been threatening Knoxville two months. Why was the garrison not reinforced? Why were the rebels allowed to take island No 60 in the Miss. with the negroes?

Yours in haste

G P Marsh note:H Powers Esq

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