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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 25, 1859.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 25, 1859.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb590425

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 25, 1859., Original located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washinton, D.C., file 7002., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb590425 (accessed September 02, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated April 25, 1859.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Private
Burlington April 25 59


Dear Baird

I am as unfit to succeed Dr V[...], as I should be to follow you. What can I say more? I hate boys, hate tuition, hate forms, and possess only one qualification for the place, namely poverty, and this, I grieve to say is shared in as high a degree by some. others I know. I am extremely obliged to you & others for the trouble you have taken, but the objections ( I won't take up your time by detailing them) are infinite, & I have written to Pennington that I must positively decline.

Answer me in the fewest -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- words (I quake when I see the No. of your letters) first. How many more volumes ( I have nine) will there be of the Pacific RR Report? Secondly, Has Dr Bachmann or somebody else repeated Daines Barrington's experiments, & found out that birds have a natural tune, and don't adopt the song of the nurse, after all, the said Daines having humbugged himself & his readers in maintaining, that it was all a matter of imitation?

We do jointly salute you jointly

Yours truly

G. P. Marsh

Please present my regards & thanks to Mr Henry for -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- the good word I hear he spoke in my behalf.

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