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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated November 4, 1871.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated November 4, 1871.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Norton, Charles Eliot

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen711104

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated November 4, 1871., Original located at the Houghton Library, Harvard University in the Norton Papers, no. 4651., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen711104 (accessed September 16, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated November 4, 1871.

Transcribed by : Ralph H. Orth

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and, Al Hester


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Florence
Nov 4 71



Dear Mr Norton

I send you, by this post the Kirkup catalogue received from [Rocco?] for you. He writes he has a parcel from Stevens & an [...] of prints [...] model, for you, & asks where he is to send them.

Mrs. Marsh is writing to Mrs Norton in reply to her kind note, & I suppose will communicate all our family news. My Strasburg attack was not of an inflammatory, though of a very severe, character. I feel no remains of it, unless the transfer of a lameness of seven years in the left hip to the corresponding joint -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- on the other side, is to be considered such. I think, however, that is an independent movement, for the affliction has given me notice of an intention to flit a month before we left Florence.

My father used to tell a story of a boy who thought he could bear his boil better, if it were on the other leg.

I find no special benefit from the change, especially as the lameness is greater on the right side than it was on the wrong.

With kindest regards to the ladies of your family as well as to yourself I am

Very truly yours

Geo P MarshC E Norton Esq

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