page top

Letter from HIRAM POWERS to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated July 26, 1861.

Add to bookbag Add to Bookbag | Bookbag (0)

Item Description

Title: Letter from HIRAM POWERS to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated July 26, 1861.

Author

  • Powers, Hiram, 1805-1873

Recipient

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

Parent Collections

Other Formats

Access Conditions

For usage rights related to this resource please visit: http://cdi.uvm.edu/rights/
More information.

Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/hpgpm610726

Preferred citation

Letter from HIRAM POWERS to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated July 26, 1861., Original located at the University of Vermont's Special Collections in the George Perkins Marsh Collection, filed by date., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/hpgpm610726 (accessed July 25, 2014)

Letter from HIRAM POWERS to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated July 26, 1861.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski andEllen Thomson


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Florence July. 26th 1861 --



Dear Friend Marsh

on receiving your letter I began enquiry in regard to the functionary you have named -- I have effected but little as yet, but shall persevere -- My own acquaintance with the gentleman is very limited -- & I never heard him speak on politics -- I have now a letter before me--(confidential) in answer to one written by me, which gives pretty much the same account you have given--but all hearsay -- I have little--if any doubt, as to the views of the man--that they are quite on "the sunny south" side, but unless I can lay my hand on something positive, I must forbear making charges -- I know several persons who have been rather intimate with him--and shall see some of them soon--they are not now in Florence --

Depend upon it, I shall be busy--until I am satisfied that we have, or have not a traitor in charge of our affairs at Leghorn.

I have much to write to you. This is only an acknowledgement of your letter--a thousand kind words from us all, to you and yours,

H. Powers --

Add a comment:

*

* Optional

User Comments

Archbishop Hughes was one of a number of prominent Americans who went to Europe during the Civil War ostensibly as private individuals but in fact as agents of the Union, to win European sympathies for the Union.

- Peter Bridges