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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated October 26, 1870.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated October 26, 1870.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Norton, Charles Eliot

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen701026

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated October 26, 1870., Original located at the University of Vermont's Special Collections in the George Perkins Marsh Collection, filed by date., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmcen701026 (accessed December 25, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to CHARLES ELIOT NORTON, dated October 26, 1870.

Transcribed by : John Thomas, Ralph H. Orth and Ellen Thomson

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski andEllen Thomson


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Florence Oct 26 70



Dear Mr Norton

My servant was told at the British Legation this morning that L'd Acton had gone to the barvièra Q Bavière? or Bavaria? In any case, non est nivatur, & I return you your letter.

I cannot say much for our poor little niece. She raised blood from the lungs day before yesterday, for the first time. Our Irish doctor does not consider this, under the circumstances, a bad symptom. I think Dr Cipriani regard[s] it as a graver matter. She has, however, been without fever, & with comparatively little -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- little cough for two days, and we hope for the best.

As for the French,

Not much comfort for those who like them, but I am not sure that even their present condition is not, as Coleridge said of his bread and butter, "better than they deserve."

At least they ought to be cured of their prepopensa and spavalderia, which would be a blessing to their neighbors if a humiliation to them

With best regards to the ladies

I am truly yours

Geo P MarshC E Norton

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