page top

Letter from THOMAS WILLIAM SILLOWAY to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated November 5, 1858.

Add to bookbag Add to Bookbag | Bookbag (0)

Item Description

Title: Letter from THOMAS WILLIAM SILLOWAY to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated November 5, 1858.

Author

  • Silloway, Thomas William, 1828-1910

Recipient

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

Parent Collections

Other Formats

Access Conditions

For usage rights related to this resource please visit: http://cdi.uvm.edu/rights/
More information.

Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/twsgpm581105

Preferred citation

Letter from THOMAS WILLIAM SILLOWAY to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated November 5, 1858., Original located at the University of Vermont's Special Collections in the George Perkins Marsh Collection, filed by date., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/twsgpm581105 (accessed December 19, 2014)

Letter from THOMAS WILLIAM SILLOWAY to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated November 5, 1858.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski andEllen Thomson


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

State of Vermont.
Montpelier,
Nov 5 1858



Mr. Marsh. The committee have held many meetings, and give me good hearings, but Powers has employed so much time at cross questioning, carefully noting down all with such minuteness that up to now I have but just closed my direct testimony. The committee put Powers on, then myself, next, Mr. Nash, next Perkins, who built the chimney finaly Gunnison, who has just come to the cross questioning by Powers. The committee sent for Judge Porter. He came to day and is to go on tonight. I had a talk with him an hour and informed him in regard to your idea of the ten or twelve feet at the shed. He so understood it, and I see no harm of putting the bank back as proposed -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- the Judge appears to stand firm where he did, but will not in all probability do much by way of making actual trouble in the movement.

How the thing will end we cannot judge yet. The committee appear to be in my favor and I am inclined to think they are so. The Montpelier people hold back some or at least I think they fear agitation. I am active up to Now. Bradley and Merrill are still at work. Them members of the house appear to be in my favor. I know of few if any who would say a word to -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- thwart my purposes.

My All depends on this action. I am out of pocket much more than I was the day I first saw Vermont, My time is all lost, and more than that I am involved by the employment of counsel. The matter ends not there I am worse off in reputation than had I never seen or been known in the affair. My reputation depended on that building and I did my best, at the start, and all through the trouble speaking boldly at the proper time, and doing all as properly as I could. I must be protected now in some way. The evils are too many and too great to be permitted to bear me down. An adverse report from that committee would be worse than a defeat, for how I could extricate myself I know not. I thank you -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- for all you have done to aid me and hope to merit a continuance of your favor.

The House has adjourned tonight over to Teusday. So we can have no more hearings till Teusday night if we can then.

I am yours truly

Thomas W. Silloway

Add a comment:

*

* Optional

User Comments