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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER F. BAIRD, dated June 9, 1848.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER F. BAIRD, dated June 9, 1848.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

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Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER F. BAIRD, dated June 9, 1848., Original located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washinton, D.C., file 7002. Original located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washinton, D.C., file 7002., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb480609 (accessed March 05, 2015)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER F. BAIRD, dated June 9, 1848.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Washington June 9 1848


Carlisle

Dear Sir

My son, whom, as you will remember, I left with Dr Siedhof last autumn, and who, as I had every reason to suppose was doing very well, has had a difficulty with Dr S. and is obliged to leave his school. I have no doubt, that in the particular affair, which led to his dismissal, George conducted in a very insolent and improper manner, and was wholly in the wrong throughout. Still I must take some portion of the blame myself, for having authorised an apparent violation of the rules of the school, in allowing him to make some purchases of clothing, instead of -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- to Dr S. directly, and I think that Dr S. in dismissing him suddenly, without any notice to me of any previous misconduct, at a time when he knew I could not, without great difficulty, make immediate provision for him, has conducted with a haste, and a disregard of his obligations both to the child and to me, which is quite as discreditable to a man of his age and experience, as George's impertinence, & disobedience are to a boy of fifteen. The day the difficulty occurred, Dr S. wrote me that he should keep him only till he could receive my answer to his letter. I replied, that in my present position, I could not in a moment procure another place for George, but that if, upon further consideration, Dr S. still declined to allow him to remain, I would take him away as soon as I could determine where to send him. Dr S. letter was dated last Sunday, & received -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- [...], I mean time [...] for a reply to my letter. I hoped that his own good sense would induce him after a days reflection, to propose of his own accord to keep George through the quarter but as he has not chosen to do this, I suppose his passion will continue to triumph over his reason, & that I must accordingly take the child away.

I know of no suitable school in New England, and it has occurred to me, that among your German friends, there might be some one who would be willing to take charge of him He is now 15, and is nearly fit for college, though imperfect in English. I do not wish him to enter college this fall but to pursue English, German, & classical studies for another year at least before entering. I prefer by all means a private school, and am willing to pay a high rate of compensation, though -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- I think I [...] terms, considering the character of the accommodations, [...], with all the excellent, instruction, exorbitant. I am sorry to take a moment of your time, but the great importance of the matter, both to the future interests of my son, & our own feelings, will I hope justify me in asking you to make inquiry & write me at [...] practicable. It is long since we have heard from any of you. I hope your silence bodes no evil. With sincere good wishes from all mine to all of yours

George P Marsh

P.S. In all Dr Siedhofs previous letters he had expressed himself as volkommen zufrieden with G's conduct, though he now complains of other misconduct, which he had not chosen before to communicate--

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