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Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated September 8, 1854.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated September 8, 1854.

Author

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Recipient

  • Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/topic

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb540908

Preferred citation

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated September 8, 1854., Original located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washinton, D.C., file 7002., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/gpmsfb540908 (accessed April 18, 2014)

Letter from GEORGE PERKINS MARSH to SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD, dated September 8, 1854.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski and


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Burlington Sept 8 1854


Dear Baird

The postmaster at Boston says your pretense of writing to me there is a fable. Letter, saith he, (Major) never miscarry, and (Minor) no such has been received, argal (conclusion) no such was ever written. I am loth to believe the postmaster, but I must. Syllogisms be conclusive, and as a lawyer, I am bound to hold for truth whatever is proved. I am grieved you should meet your ancient gossip, with a fib, on the threshold of his native land, but 'tis a proof of the degeneracy of manners since my departure, Well, -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- I shall forgive you, if you write me forthwith at East Greenwich, R.I. (whither I go after my wife), and if not, not. I have, in small quantity, seeds & shells for you, as well as a vivarium of the snails I wrote of, but I think I shall keep them till I go to Washington, which I think will be about Dec. 1'-

The evil tidings we heard of dear Mary were very painful to us, and I am very happy to learn, that her health is improved. I trust we shall find her quite well in the autumn. Mrs Marsh's mother died on Sunday last, -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- having been taken ill a day or two after Mrs M. reached her ancient home. It was a happy circumstance, that the old lady's life was spared until her daughters return, after so long a separation, & it is remarkable, that of her nine children, seven should have returned from California, Turkey, Missouri & Illinois to be present at her death.

I am sorry about the Smithsonian quarrel. I don't know the details, but I do know, that the law has been injudiciously and what is worse unfairly administered. The mere question, what is expedient, may have two -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- sides to it, but that, what is honest, can have but one. I dare say Jewett is glad to be off. I wish Choate had the moral courage and disinterestedness to expose some people as they deserve, but I am sorry to say (inter nos), that I see no ground for any such expectation. Kindest regards to Mary-

Yours truly

G P Marsh note:Prof. Baird

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