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Collection Summary
Administrative Information
Access:
Publication Rights:
Biography
Scope and Content
Container List

Colonel Isaac Clark Papers

Collection Summary

Repository
University of Vermont Libraries Special Collections Burlington, Vermont 05405-3596
Creator
Clark, Isaac, 1749-1822
Title
Colonel Isaac Clark Papers
Quantity
one box
Shelf location
Special Collections, Bailey/Howe Library.
Language
English
Abstract
The Colonel Isaac Clark papers consist primarily of personal and military correspondence from 1812-1821. Clark's letters relate to troop activity in the Champlain Valley, and contain materials pertaining to political issues before and during the War of 1812.

Preferred Citation:

[Identification of item] Colonel Isaac Clark Collection, Special Collections, University of Vermont Library.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Vermont, Bailey/Howe Library, Special Collections © 1998 

Access:

Collection is open for research.

Publication Rights:

All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Curator of Manuscripts.

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Biography

Isaac Clark (1742-1822) of Castleton, Vermont served in both the American Revolution and the war of 1812. Clark's public and military career spanned more than 50 years, and involved him in many of the events of Vermont's early history. A hero of the American Revolution, he participated in the Battle of Bennington on August 16, 1777, and the re-capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1778. Clark married Governor Thomas Chittenden's daughter, Hannah, in 1779. He was involved in the Haldimand Negotiations briefly, and remained firmly allied with the Chittenden/Allen faction throughout the Republic of Vermont's tenure. Clark represented the towns of Ira and Castleton in the General Assembly for a total of seven terms. He served as Rutland County judge from 1806 to 1811, and on the Council of Censors from 1806 to 1813.

Isaac Clark is best-known for his leadership of the Vermont troops during the War of 1812. His responsibilities as Colonel of the 11th Infantry, Champlain District, included patrolling the Quebec/Vermont border to prevent the lucrative smuggling trade throughout the conflict, and he led several forays into lower Quebec in 1813 and 1814. His son, Isaac Jr., joined the 11th Infantry, and served at Plattsburgh, New York and Sackets Harbor on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. Another son, Satterlee, at Annapolis, kept Clark apprised of the political situation in Washington, D.C. During the War of 1812, Clark served with distinction, but was twice removed from his command under mysterious circumstances. Later, the Secretary of War reinstated his sword of command, and the U.S. Congress honored him for his service to his country.

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Scope and Content

The Colonel Isaac Clark Papers consist primarily of personal and military correspondence from 1812 to 1821. Clark's letters relate to troop activity in the Champlain Valley, while Isaac Jr.'s provide some details of recruiting efforts and troop life in the northern outposts. The Papers also contain materials pertaining to political issues before and during the War of 1812. The Papers are arranged in chronological order.

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